Workroom/Editathon planning checklist

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More ideas https://etherpad.wikimedia.org/p/TeachWikipediaSeattle

Before the workshop

  • Confirm that the audience wants an editathon, and reconsider other options.
  • Other options can be a lecture, group discussion, tour of Wikipedia and Wikimedia platforms, or social meetup over coffee. Consider the desires and needs of the Wikimedia community as a whole, and not just the 0.1% who edit! Different people can contribute on their own terms in ways other than direct editing. Consider this scheme by Wikimedia France.
  • During months with weather that encourages people to spend their free time outside, schedule at least a few outdoor activities like wiki-expeditions and Summer of Monuments. People may avoid indoor edit-a-thons.
  • For groups which we want to recruit into editing Wikipedia, go to them instead of asking them to come to us. For example, instead of having an event at a library about Seattle maritime commerce, go to the wharfs and hold an event with an interested group there.
  • Choose focus
  • Subject area, such as "Women in the Arts", "Internet Security", "Pioneer Square Neighborhood", "Public Education", or "Cancer Research"
  • Wikimedia project, such as English Wikipedia, Commons, Wikisource, Wikispecies, or Wiktionary
  • Estimate attendance
  • Arrange for appropriate ratio of experienced editors to new editors
  • Arrange venue.
  • Check for projector
  • Check if presenters will need a VGA, HDMI, or other adapter to use the projector
  • Check for speakers, if the presentation will include playback of audio
  • Check site policies about photography, drinks and food
  • Check room seating capacity with tables (which is about half of Fire Marshal assessed room capacity)
  • Check for availability of tables
  • Check for whiteboard and pen availability
  • Check Internet speed.
  • Check Internet policies. What authentication is required for Internet access?
  • Check for rangeblocks that affect the location's internet
  • Arrange time and date.
  • Check for conflicting events such as nearby sports games or road closures that may limit attendance or delay participants.
  • Send invitations.
  • See here for ideas on what to include in the invite.
  • Recruiting by Facebook seems to work best. Other methods like posters at the venue, and announcements from the venue or co-sponsor through its social media, may also work.
  • Arrange snacks, if applicable
  • Print materials for the sign-in table w/ instruction sheet detailing:
  • Agenda
  • Contact info
  • Name, email, and affiliation registration (optional)
  • "Friendly space policy"
  • Photography policy
  • About the venue:
  • Phone
  • Wifi info
  • How to create an account, including what to do if max account creation limit is reached
  • Location of restrooms
  • Emergency exits
  • Business cards
  • Swag, if applicable
  • Name tags with colored indicators about photos (green sticker == photos ok, yellow == ask first, red == no)
  • Photography info about stickers. Note: while we can't legally require compliance with the photo preferences while we're in a public space, as a courtesy we ask that everyone do so. Most people will respect others' preferences.
  • Link to page with suggested articles and suggested sources
  • Twitter hashtag for the event

At the workshop

  • Set up sign-in table
  • Introductions & interests

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  • Workshop for new editors, discussing Wikimedia's audience and reach, purpose and aspirations, content gaps, community norms and the mechanics of editing. (optionally, the group can break into a group of experienced users who start content work immediately, and a group of new users and mentors)
  • For English Wikipedia
  • For Wikimedia Commons
  • For Wikisource
  • For Wikispecies
  • For Wiktionary
  • New users create a user page if they haven't done so already
  • Join the editathon course page (optional)

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  • Break time. Users write interests on a whiteboard and sign up under interests

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  • Open editing

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  • Wrap up
  • Surveys
  • Next steps

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After the workshop:

  • Write report
  • A month after the event, update the report with viewership stats for content that was created an uploaded. Email the participants and/or post on their talk pages. Invite them to the next event.
  • Try to have monthly events at the same location, possibly with varying themes, to build a group of experienced contributors at one location at a time. Continuity is good. Some contributors contribute regularly and only at edit-a-thons.